Don & Elizabeth Hillman International Child Health Grant Awardees: Where are they now?
CPS ePoster Library. Hunter A. 06/25/15; 99177; 115
Dr. Andrea Hunter
Dr. Andrea Hunter
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Abstract
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BACKGROUND:
In 2003, the Don & Elizabeth Hillman International Child Health Grant was created by the Canadian Pediatric Society (CPS) Global Child & Youth Health Section to promote international health opportunities for residents and fellows. Forty awards were administered ($750 - $1000) from 2003 to 2013, for use towards costs of paediatrics elective in low-middle income countries (LMIC). It is one of the few funding opportunities of its kind available to Canadian pediatric trainees. It is timely to evaluate the impact of providing supportive funds for such experiences and their effects on recipients career paths.
OBJECTIVES:
This evaluation aimed to describe interest, enablers, and perceived barriers of pursuing a career in global health amongst those who completed a funded international elective during residency, and to examine how funded international residency elective experiences may have influenced the time dedicated to global health activities and the patient populations they serve.
METHODS
Past Hillman Grant recipients were contacted by email to complete an online survey, which was designed from review of relevant literature, to assess interest, perceived enablers and barriers in global health experiences and career paths. Data were collected and managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at University of British Columbia.
RESULTS
Nineteen out of 40 grant awardees completed the online survey; 5 are still in residency or fellowship. While for 8/19, receiving the grant influenced their decision to go, the remainder would have done an international elective regardless but qualitative review indicated that it assisted in lifting ‘burden of cost’ and was appreciated but not sole influential factor in participating. Nearly half (47%) have pursued further training related to global health, while 7 participants are planning to do so in the future.
Majority (79%) endorsed that participation in international electives encouraged future global health involvement, while all respondents felt the experience influenced their attitudes towards health care. 10/14 pediatrician respondents indicated that they currently spend time in GH activities (both locally and abroad); they are involved with caring for families receiving social assistance (14/19), newcomer health (11/19), First Nations/Inuit/Metis health (10/19), GH education within Canada (14/19), and health education outside Canada (10/19).

Enablers to participation in global health activities include: family support (11/19), departmental support (10/19), international electives (9/19) and mentorship (8/19). Most significant barriers to participation in GH activities were: scheduling (16/19) with 68% of these indicating need to use vacation time, financial (15/19), and family obligations (10/19).
CONCLUSION
Recipients of the Hillman grants generally are involved with the care of vulnerable children either within or outside Canada, and for many, their international elective experience influenced those career directions.
BACKGROUND:
In 2003, the Don & Elizabeth Hillman International Child Health Grant was created by the Canadian Pediatric Society (CPS) Global Child & Youth Health Section to promote international health opportunities for residents and fellows. Forty awards were administered ($750 - $1000) from 2003 to 2013, for use towards costs of paediatrics elective in low-middle income countries (LMIC). It is one of the few funding opportunities of its kind available to Canadian pediatric trainees. It is timely to evaluate the impact of providing supportive funds for such experiences and their effects on recipients career paths.
OBJECTIVES:
This evaluation aimed to describe interest, enablers, and perceived barriers of pursuing a career in global health amongst those who completed a funded international elective during residency, and to examine how funded international residency elective experiences may have influenced the time dedicated to global health activities and the patient populations they serve.
METHODS
Past Hillman Grant recipients were contacted by email to complete an online survey, which was designed from review of relevant literature, to assess interest, perceived enablers and barriers in global health experiences and career paths. Data were collected and managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at University of British Columbia.
RESULTS
Nineteen out of 40 grant awardees completed the online survey; 5 are still in residency or fellowship. While for 8/19, receiving the grant influenced their decision to go, the remainder would have done an international elective regardless but qualitative review indicated that it assisted in lifting ‘burden of cost’ and was appreciated but not sole influential factor in participating. Nearly half (47%) have pursued further training related to global health, while 7 participants are planning to do so in the future.
Majority (79%) endorsed that participation in international electives encouraged future global health involvement, while all respondents felt the experience influenced their attitudes towards health care. 10/14 pediatrician respondents indicated that they currently spend time in GH activities (both locally and abroad); they are involved with caring for families receiving social assistance (14/19), newcomer health (11/19), First Nations/Inuit/Metis health (10/19), GH education within Canada (14/19), and health education outside Canada (10/19).

Enablers to participation in global health activities include: family support (11/19), departmental support (10/19), international electives (9/19) and mentorship (8/19). Most significant barriers to participation in GH activities were: scheduling (16/19) with 68% of these indicating need to use vacation time, financial (15/19), and family obligations (10/19).
CONCLUSION
Recipients of the Hillman grants generally are involved with the care of vulnerable children either within or outside Canada, and for many, their international elective experience influenced those career directions.
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