Banning tanning.
CPS ePoster Library. Brulé V. 06/25/15; 99251; 190
Dr. Valerie Brulé
Dr. Valerie Brulé
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Abstract
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BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization lists artificial tanning
beds as a class one physical carcinogen. Tanning bed use is associated with
a 75% increased risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma if used before the
age of 35. In 2012, the Manitoba government announced a parental consent
law that requires minors to have a guardian present or sign a permission
form for children and youth to use artificial tanning equipment. This
law falls below the national standards as set by the Canadian Pediatric
Society (CPS); furthermore, parental consent laws have been shown to be
ineffective at changing commercial tanning exposure in youth.
OBJECTIVES: Our group of senior pediatric residents worked on a project
advocating for a complete ban of commercial tanning use for all youth
under the age of 18 in Manitoba.
DESIGN/METHODS: The first component of the project focused on community
education. Residents presented to middle and high school students
about the harmful consequences of tanning, and created educational pamphlets
that were made available at several general pediatric clinics. The second
component of our project focused on legislative change and public
forum advocacy. Residents engaged with the media to bring awareness to the
general public about the risks of artificial tanning. A petition calling for a
complete ban of artificial tanning for minors was also created. This petition,
which included over 1000 signatures, along with evidence supporting a full
ban for artificial tanning was presented to the Manitoba Ministers of Health
and Healthy Living in an invited forum to advocate for legislative change.
RESULTS: These efforts were successful and resulted in the recent proposed
legislation calling for a full ban on artificial tanning for minors; this
is expected to pass into Manitoba law in the spring of 2015.
CONCLUSION: This project serves as an example of how physicians can
promote the health of their patients via community education, collaboration
with public health experts, and involvement in local government.
BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization lists artificial tanning
beds as a class one physical carcinogen. Tanning bed use is associated with
a 75% increased risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma if used before the
age of 35. In 2012, the Manitoba government announced a parental consent
law that requires minors to have a guardian present or sign a permission
form for children and youth to use artificial tanning equipment. This
law falls below the national standards as set by the Canadian Pediatric
Society (CPS); furthermore, parental consent laws have been shown to be
ineffective at changing commercial tanning exposure in youth.
OBJECTIVES: Our group of senior pediatric residents worked on a project
advocating for a complete ban of commercial tanning use for all youth
under the age of 18 in Manitoba.
DESIGN/METHODS: The first component of the project focused on community
education. Residents presented to middle and high school students
about the harmful consequences of tanning, and created educational pamphlets
that were made available at several general pediatric clinics. The second
component of our project focused on legislative change and public
forum advocacy. Residents engaged with the media to bring awareness to the
general public about the risks of artificial tanning. A petition calling for a
complete ban of artificial tanning for minors was also created. This petition,
which included over 1000 signatures, along with evidence supporting a full
ban for artificial tanning was presented to the Manitoba Ministers of Health
and Healthy Living in an invited forum to advocate for legislative change.
RESULTS: These efforts were successful and resulted in the recent proposed
legislation calling for a full ban on artificial tanning for minors; this
is expected to pass into Manitoba law in the spring of 2015.
CONCLUSION: This project serves as an example of how physicians can
promote the health of their patients via community education, collaboration
with public health experts, and involvement in local government.
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